New York: After Our Bodies Meet: From Resistance to Potentiality

Press Release by Leslie + Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art and Fresh Fruit Festival

Leslie-Lohman Museum presents an exhibition of queer feminist artists exploring the body as site of resistance, envisioning a positive queer future.

After Our Bodies Meet: From Resistance to Potentiality

Curated by Alexis Heller
Exhibition Dates: June 5 – July 27, 2014
Opening Reception: June 5, 6 – 8 pm
at Leslie + Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, 26 Wooster Street in the SoHo neighborhood of New York City.

After Our Bodies Meet: From Resistance to Potentiality opens at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art on June 5 and runs through July 27, 2014. Presented as part of the 12th annual All Out Arts Fresh Fruit Festival, the exhibition explores queer feminist artists’ responses to dominant notions about the body from the 1970s to present day. Reflecting the ever-growing diversity of feminist art, this exhibition provides a cross-cultural examination of how artists represent the body to challenge past and present forms of oppression and to envision a queer future.

After Our Bodies Meet: From Resistance to Potentiality, curated by Alexis Heller, traces the efforts of contemporary queer artists within the legacy of early feminist art. Bridging these historic and contemporary endeavors not only honors the pioneers of gender-conscious art but also highlights the evolution of feminist thought within artistic representations of queer bodies, including some that question the gender binary on which feminism was first conceived.

The works of Tee Corinne and Cathy Cade sought to document and empower the burgeoning lesbian feminist community, emphasizing the female body’s capacity for love, agency and pleasure outside of the heterosexual imagination. Today, South African artist and “visual activist” Zanele Muholi recognizes this same need to preserve marginalized histories, bringing attention to underrepresented populations of black lesbian and transgender individuals, as well as the targeted violence that threatens their existence. For her ongoing series Faces and Phases, Muholi’s black-and-white photographic portraits archive the diversity and resilience of her black queer community in South Africa and abroad, while for Isilumo siyaluma (2006-2011), Muholi generates a series of kaleidoscopic digital collages of menstrual blood stains to memorialize the rape and murder of black lesbians in South Africa.

Heather Cassils’ dynamic performance, Becoming An Image (2012), also evokes the brutalization of queer bodies as the artist’s mixed martial arts blows are imprinted onto a 1,500-pound block of clay. Staged in complete darkness, Cassils’ strenuous movements are only made visible by flash photography, capturing fleeting moments of the action, which, like the artist’s experience as a transgender man, is in a continuous process of change and becoming.

Sophia Wallace’s ongoing mixed media project CLITERACY, exposes the irony of society’s obsession with and ignorance of female sexuality. CLITERACY, 100 Natural Laws (2012) includes a monumental wall of texts which challenge phallocentric biases in science, law, philosophy, politics and the art world. Wallace’s focus on the clitoris and female pleasure serves to question and counteract the history of misinformation regarding women’s bodies and the concomitant oppression therein.

Inspired by Indian comic books, Hindu mythology and American science fiction Chitra Ganesh’s digital collages also draw from disparate materials and cultural sources to offer alternate narratives of female sexuality and power. Ganesh’s surrealistic and hybridized female forms collide beauty and abjection, commemorating marginalized and excluded figures from art, history and literature. In Ganesh’s work, the body serves as a site of transgression and revision, tearing apart stereotypes and histories only to reassemble them into a radical vision of corporeality, citizenship and desire.

This exhibition demonstrates how feminist artists have repositioned the political potential of activism into art, allowing critiques of the past to provide space for imagining new queer possibilities. Featuring work from Laura Aguilar, Cathy Cade, Heather Cassils, Tee A. Corinne, Zanele Muholi,Chitra Ganesh, Allyson Mitchell, Zanele Muholi, Catherine Opie, Sophia Wallace, and Chris E. Vargas, these artists subvert the mythologies and ideals surrounding lesbian and transgender bodies and foreground queer bodies obscured by invisibility.

There will be an Opening Reception on June 5th from 6 to 8 pm, as well as various events throughout the exhibition that explore these important issues and themes. Visit freshfruitfestival.com for a full schedule of events for All Out Arts Fresh Fruit Festival which will be held from July 7 to 20, 2014.

Sophia Wallace on Cliteracy


Artist Sophia Wallace discusses CLITERACY her epic, mixed media project which explores a paradox; the global obsession with sexualizing female bodies in a world that is illiterate when it comes to female sexuality. The above video is directed and produced by Amon Focus

I first heard about Cliteracy in 2012, when I made the re-post New York – Cliteracy by Sophia Wallace about the exhibition of Cliteracy, and artist talk by Sophia Wallace at Dumbo Arts Center. – Now my European facebook friends have started sharing ‘Cliteracy 101: Artist Sophia Wallace Wants You To Know The Truth About The Clitoris‘ an article by Dominique Mosbergen of the Huffington Post, and I have taken this as a reminder that I should google Sophia’s art project and see what has happened to it, her life and creative practice. In the above video Sophia talks about her work with the art project Cliteracy – using both fine art aestetics and street art to spread the word about the secret of the anatomy of the clitoris. Enjoy!

Cliteracy by Sophia Wallace, 2012
Press photo by Sophia Wallace, 2012

Related Link

Sophia Wallace’s online portfolio
Sophia Wallace’s blog at Tumblr

 

New York – Cliteracy by Sophia Wallace

Cliteracy by Sophia Wallace, 2012

Cliteracy by Sophia Wallace, 2012

CLITERACY, 100 Natural Laws, by Sophia Wallace at Scenes a Faire
October 5 to 21, 2012
Dumbo Arts Center
Brooklyn, New York
USA

Dumbo Arts Center (DAC) writes “Scènes à Faire features artworks and programming made in response to the complex relationship between legal and artistic practices by the artists, writer, and curators of the 2012 Art & Law Residency program. The exhibition title, Scènes à Faire, stems from the term used in theatrical and legal arenas as the “scene to be made” and that essential element which is an obligatory component that cannot be isolated, copyrighted, or ignored.”

Leslie-Lohman Museum recommends: CLITERACY, 100 Natural Laws by Sophia Wallace currently in the Scenes a Faire Exhibition on view at Dumbo Art Center October 5 – 21, 2012. Scènes à Faire is the culminating exhibition of the Art & Law Residency Program’s third year. Programming features works by the 2012 Residency artists, curators, and writer made in response to the complex relationship between legal and artistic practices. The diverse projects in Scènes à Faire address issues surrounding the law such a power, privilege, intent, loss, liminal boundaries, language, and the truth.

Artist Talk

Sophia Wallace: Oct. 16, 7-8:30 pm at Dumbo Arts Center

Related Link

Sophia Wallace’s online portfolio
Cliteracy 101: Artist Sophia Wallace Wants You To Know The Truth About The Clitoris